NWA Clash of the Champions 3: Fall Brawl 09/07/1988

It’s been a while since I posted a written review of a show, so here is a look at Clash of the Champions 3, from Albany, GA on 9/7/1988 for the last Jim Crockett Promotions supershow. With such a big show, you’d think they would pull out all the stops, but they didn’t because they had a habit of screwing obvious things up. Maybe that was part of the sale to Ted Turner. This show didn’t have Flair (except as a host), Lex Luger, the Midnight Express, Road Warriors, and the team of Arn Anderson/Tully Blanchard.

The latter of those would make the big news of the week: Despite being tag champs, they quit on the spot 3 days after this show at a house show in Philly and they had to scramble and put the belts on the Midnight Express in an untelevised match. And yet they STILL did a double pin spot, protecting guys who were leaving. Continue reading NWA Clash of the Champions 3: Fall Brawl 09/07/1988

Highlights From Bob Backlund’s Book: Part 6 (Hatchet Edition)

A lot less time between blog posts this time, as it’s on to part 6 of the highlights of Bob Backlund’s 2015 autobiography.

“I’m going to kill that son of a bitch!” Oops.

The first hot angle with Backlund as champion was against “High Chief” Peter Maivia, the grandfather of The Rock. Maivia attacked Backlund’s manager Arnold Skaaland while teaming with Bob and it was a real shock and not just because it meant Skaaland actually did something other than go to the back and play cards. In the promo afterward, Backlund lost his way wondering if the whole world was against him, and declaring that he would “kill” Maivia, a real no no.

Antonio Inoki was here for that card as well, and was being billed as the “Martial Arts Champion,” as the front office was trying to figure out what to do with him to make him a draw in America, where he was still virtually unknown.

Inoki was a hero in Japan but never got any traction in the United States, which I chalk up to two things. First, the concept of a Japanese hero was something that hadn’t really been considered in U.S. wrestling, as they were usually the cliché foreign bad guys. Second, his working style was not something that was easy to digest for fans of American wrestling. Personally, I hate him for the Muhammad Ali fiasco because the joke of a match damaged Ali’s legs to the point where he was never the same athlete. Continue reading Highlights From Bob Backlund’s Book: Part 6 (Hatchet Edition)

Highlights of Bob Backlund’s Book: Part 5 (Early title reign edition)

After an even longer hiatus as I have focused more on the Greetings From Allentown podcast, it’s back to more highlights of Bob Backlund’s 2015 autobiography

Billy has also said over the years that he and Bruno talked on the night of their steel cage match in Philadelphia about pulling a last-minute screwjob over on the promoters.

I’m going to suggest that Graham is full of crap on this one. Bruno didn’t seem like the kind of guy who would participate in such a thing, especially since it would be putting the title back on him which is something the Living Legend was precisely trying to get away from so it makes zero sense. Losing the world title really screwed with Graham’s mind.

Billy’s face was blank and emotionless—quite a change from the usual. I could tell he was really struggling with it all.

Backlund making my previous point, and something that virtually everyone has pointed out. While it’s probable that Graham would have been a success as a babyface champion, the issue of his longevity wouldn’t have changed. His body was going to break down whether he was happy with wrestling or not. Continue reading Highlights of Bob Backlund’s Book: Part 5 (Early title reign edition)