Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 2 (Ray Stevens Edition)

I don’t have much of an opinion about last night’s SummerSlam other than they need to have shorter shows because the crowd and TV audience gets burned out. Today it’s back to Pat Patterson’s new book “Accepted” with some Ray Stevens stories. Those two were one of the best tag teams of the 1970s and probably all time. The shame is that little footage from that time and territory (San Francisco) exists.

I admit I did this kind of thing a few times for Ray, and on the road Stevens would even pick up a girl here and there and get her to give me a blow job. When he would ask me how it was, I would tell him, “I certainly could have given her lessons.”

Gotta love that Patterson is truly committed as a wingman. And again, not afraid to laugh at himself. Continue reading Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 2 (Ray Stevens Edition)

Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 1 (Early Career Edition)

As  mentioned in the last post, I was on vacation last week. The great thing about having a Kindle (or any e-book reader) is that I can immediately get new books and highlight things to comment on for this blog. This book is a very new release having come out only a week ago today. Patterson, born Pierre Cleremont in 1942, has led a very interesting life in the wrestling business. He’s very well-known for being gay, but what he should be known for is being perhaps the greatest booker/producer in the history of wrestling. The Royal Rumble speaks for itself, but he also held together the first WrestleMania main event, was in one of the greatest tag teams ever with Ray Stevens, and as Vince McMahon’s right hand man he was an advocate for smaller wrestlers like Shawn Michaels and Bret Hart. I recommend this book highly, so let’s peek at some highlights. Continue reading Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 1 (Early Career Edition)

Sex, Lies and Headlocks Part 3 (Potpurri Edition)

Back from a nice vacation in the Outer Banks now and while I’d like to do a 3000 word rant on why Triple H’s recent comments to ESPN are full of shit, along with a side piece on why ESPN is full of shit in general too, instead you’ll get part 3 of Sex Lies and Headlocks because I’ve read even better books and want to get to them. Like Pat Patterson’s book Accepted (released last week) which was a great read. This edition is a random collection of 90s stuff:

With a heavy tan that he deepened with skin creams so he could pass for black, he became a modestly successful midcard act at WCW.

I always thought Johnny B. Badd/Marc Mero was black. When I first saw him in 1991 WCW, I thought that and it’s not like you could pick up a wrestling magazine to get that sort of information. His initial act was very much like a Little Richard type, probably leaning too much to homophobic stuff which is why it got changed. And yeah, I thought PN News was black too. None of this really matters, though. Continue reading Sex, Lies and Headlocks Part 3 (Potpurri Edition)

Sex, Lies and Headlocks: Part 2 (WCW Edition)

While the book “Sex, Lies, and Headlocks” is mostly about Vince McMahon and the WWF, there are large sections covering WCW to give the full perspective of the #1 competitor. But first, a bit on the good doctor from Pennsylvania. Continue reading Sex, Lies and Headlocks: Part 2 (WCW Edition)

Sex, Lies and Headlocks: Part 1 (Early Vince Edition)

Onto the next book, “Sex, Lies And Headlocks” by Shawn Assael and Mike Mooneyham, originally published in 2004. There are some interesting anecdotes but overall the book was a mild disappointment, probably because the James Dixon series on WWF from 1995-98 is better. But here are the highlights:

However, he also said that he was long estranged from her and hinted that the reason was sexual abuse. “Was all the abuse physical, or was there sexual abuse, too?” Playboy asked him. “That’s not anything I’d like to embellish,” he replied, “just because it’s so weird.”

Vince McMahon talking about his birth mother. If you ever wondered why his perspective and sense of humor is so screwed up there is your answer. Continue reading Sex, Lies and Headlocks: Part 1 (Early Vince Edition)

Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 3 (Vince Russo Edition)

Time to put a bow on J.J. Dillon’s 2005 book “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls”, which at one time was apparently hard to find. So it gives me hope that the much ballyhooed Gary Hart book will make it to e-book at some point.

Of course, guys like Kevin Nash and Scott Hall, who came from the WWF, were accustomed to getting an accounting of what was sold, so they were very suspicious over their merchandise payoffs in WCW.

It seems like EVERYTHING was done by the seat of the pants in WCW. Even dating to the Crockett days, since Dillon mentioned that the company sued the merchandise guy for ripping people off near the end. Hall and Nash were right to be suspicious since it was rumored that everything was rigged toward Hulk Hogan from a merch perspective. Continue reading Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 3 (Vince Russo Edition)

Highlights from JJ Dillon’s Book: Part 2 (Horsemen Edition)

We are back to JJ Dillon’s book from 2005 “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls” and at the height of the author’s career: his time managing the Four Horsemen.

The other boys used to make light of the fact that it was a good thing that Flair never wanted to touch cocaine, because with his nose being as big as it is, there wouldn’t have been any left for anyone else.

Believe it or not, I had never noticed that Flair had a big nose until I started hearing these jokes made about him. Flair was a legendary partier, but he would not do cocaine and he would not smoke cigarettes because that would kill his whole “60 minutes every night” thing. He would do chewing tobacco and an unlimited supply of Seabreezes (vodka w/cranberry and grapefruit juice) and something like Miller Lite. Continue reading Highlights from JJ Dillon’s Book: Part 2 (Horsemen Edition)

Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 1

Since I enjoyed putting together passages from Bret Hart’s book, I figured I might do it for other wrestling books. Maybe I’ll try to cut it down from 17 parts. Ergo, a look at J.J. Dillon’s book will run 3 parts. Dillon is best known as the manager of the Four Horsemen from 1985-89, and as the on-screen WCW Commissioner from 1997 to 1999. But he also played a key role behind the scenes in the WWF from 1989 to 1996 doing the grunt work, and was a wrestler himself in various territories. The book is “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls”, an interesting quote itself that will be covered eventually.

I had a passion for baseball, but when the Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles, my interest waned somewhat. 

A common issue, actually. My wife’s grandparents (born in the mid-1930s) remain pissed to this day about the Dodgers leaving. Hell, even Mets ownership had Citi Field built, but turned it into a monument to the Dodgers and not their own franchise. Continue reading Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 1