WWF Summerslam 1997 – 08/03/1997

I LOVE this poster
I LOVE this poster

Since the last WWF PPV review I did was Canadian Stampede, might as well go to the next show which is the 1997 Summerslam. I was very excited for this card at the time since I was too dumb to figure out there was only one way they could logically book the main event. And you had stipulations all over the place like an old Mid-South card. Our hosts are Vince McMahon, Jim Ross, and Jerry Lawler from the then-Continental Airlines Arena in New Jersey. Continue reading WWF Summerslam 1997 – 08/03/1997

Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson Part 3: (1980s WWF Edition)

In lieu of a goofy intro, let’s get right to the part of Pat Patterson’s book with the most interest: his time in WWF as Vince McMahon’s right hand man.

The third match with Backlund along with the famous match with Slaughter I had later were my greatest moments as a wrestler.

Patterson in the book is very proud of his series with Backlund at Madison Square Garden because of the quality of the matches combined with the fact that it was a four match and not the usual three match series that would go countout-DQ-blowoff. The Slaughter “Alley Fight” match from May 1981 is one of those matches that is as good as everyone says it is. Pat wears the iconic “I Love NY” shirt during the bout. Continue reading Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson Part 3: (1980s WWF Edition)

WWF Championship Wrestling 01/07/1984

Interim Champion
Interim Champion

The World Wrestling Federation did not just turn the page from 1983 to 1984, they threw out the damn book and created one on their own. Vince McMahon took the WWF out of the National Wrestling Alliance in 1983 with the idea of going national himself in mind. This is ground zero for the beginning of that because we have four debuts on this show: Continue reading WWF Championship Wrestling 01/07/1984

Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 2 (Ray Stevens Edition)

I don’t have much of an opinion about last night’s SummerSlam other than they need to have shorter shows because the crowd and TV audience gets burned out. Today it’s back to Pat Patterson’s new book “Accepted” with some Ray Stevens stories. Those two were one of the best tag teams of the 1970s and probably all time. The shame is that little footage from that time and territory (San Francisco) exists.

I admit I did this kind of thing a few times for Ray, and on the road Stevens would even pick up a girl here and there and get her to give me a blow job. When he would ask me how it was, I would tell him, “I certainly could have given her lessons.”

Gotta love that Patterson is truly committed as a wingman. And again, not afraid to laugh at himself. Continue reading Highlights of “Accepted” by Pat Patterson: Part 2 (Ray Stevens Edition)

Sex, Lies and Headlocks Part 3 (Potpurri Edition)

Back from a nice vacation in the Outer Banks now and while I’d like to do a 3000 word rant on why Triple H’s recent comments to ESPN are full of shit, along with a side piece on why ESPN is full of shit in general too, instead you’ll get part 3 of Sex Lies and Headlocks because I’ve read even better books and want to get to them. Like Pat Patterson’s book Accepted (released last week) which was a great read. This edition is a random collection of 90s stuff:

With a heavy tan that he deepened with skin creams so he could pass for black, he became a modestly successful midcard act at WCW.

I always thought Johnny B. Badd/Marc Mero was black. When I first saw him in 1991 WCW, I thought that and it’s not like you could pick up a wrestling magazine to get that sort of information. His initial act was very much like a Little Richard type, probably leaning too much to homophobic stuff which is why it got changed. And yeah, I thought PN News was black too. None of this really matters, though. Continue reading Sex, Lies and Headlocks Part 3 (Potpurri Edition)

Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 3 (Vince Russo Edition)

Time to put a bow on J.J. Dillon’s 2005 book “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls”, which at one time was apparently hard to find. So it gives me hope that the much ballyhooed Gary Hart book will make it to e-book at some point.

Of course, guys like Kevin Nash and Scott Hall, who came from the WWF, were accustomed to getting an accounting of what was sold, so they were very suspicious over their merchandise payoffs in WCW.

It seems like EVERYTHING was done by the seat of the pants in WCW. Even dating to the Crockett days, since Dillon mentioned that the company sued the merchandise guy for ripping people off near the end. Hall and Nash were right to be suspicious since it was rumored that everything was rigged toward Hulk Hogan from a merch perspective. Continue reading Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 3 (Vince Russo Edition)

Highlights from JJ Dillon’s Book: Part 2 (Horsemen Edition)

We are back to JJ Dillon’s book from 2005 “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls” and at the height of the author’s career: his time managing the Four Horsemen.

The other boys used to make light of the fact that it was a good thing that Flair never wanted to touch cocaine, because with his nose being as big as it is, there wouldn’t have been any left for anyone else.

Believe it or not, I had never noticed that Flair had a big nose until I started hearing these jokes made about him. Flair was a legendary partier, but he would not do cocaine and he would not smoke cigarettes because that would kill his whole “60 minutes every night” thing. He would do chewing tobacco and an unlimited supply of Seabreezes (vodka w/cranberry and grapefruit juice) and something like Miller Lite. Continue reading Highlights from JJ Dillon’s Book: Part 2 (Horsemen Edition)

Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 1

Since I enjoyed putting together passages from Bret Hart’s book, I figured I might do it for other wrestling books. Maybe I’ll try to cut it down from 17 parts. Ergo, a look at J.J. Dillon’s book will run 3 parts. Dillon is best known as the manager of the Four Horsemen from 1985-89, and as the on-screen WCW Commissioner from 1997 to 1999. But he also played a key role behind the scenes in the WWF from 1989 to 1996 doing the grunt work, and was a wrestler himself in various territories. The book is “Wrestlers Are Like Seagulls”, an interesting quote itself that will be covered eventually.

I had a passion for baseball, but when the Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles, my interest waned somewhat. 

A common issue, actually. My wife’s grandparents (born in the mid-1930s) remain pissed to this day about the Dodgers leaving. Hell, even Mets ownership had Citi Field built, but turned it into a monument to the Dodgers and not their own franchise. Continue reading Highlights from J.J. Dillon’s Book: Part 1

Highlights from Bret Hart’s Book: Part 16 (Career-Ending Edition)

Got a big announcement coming up on the blog in the next week or two, let’s balance that good news with the sadness of Bret Hart’s book as his wrestling career has come to an end.

Unfortunately for Russo, nobody understood it.

If someone who was there and taking part in this nonsense had no idea, what hope was there for the audience to make sense of what was happening? Continue reading Highlights from Bret Hart’s Book: Part 16 (Career-Ending Edition)

Saturday Night’s Main Event #15 – 03/12/1988

Big changes on the March 1988 Saturday Night’s Main Event: Hulk Hogan no longer is the champion! However on this show, he has an issue with Race. No, not people of color but King Harley Race. WrestleMania 4 is coming and many other key players are here: Andre the Giant, Ted DiBiase, Randy Savage, and even tournament entrants One Man Gang and Greg Valentine. The show from Nashville kicks off with Vince McMahon saying that he’s from the South! Jeez, didn’t expect that from the guy who put hillbilly gimmicks on many southerners and was rather ashamed of his roots. Co-host Jesse Ventura rips on Vince and says he has a red neck. Continue reading Saturday Night’s Main Event #15 – 03/12/1988